BUILDYOURMEMORY.COM / A mnemonics and memory improvement resource
Mnemonics and memory / Build Your Memory
roman room statue

How memory operates
Why we forget
Observation and memory
Using mnemonics to link together memories
Mnemonics to master a foreign language
Mnemonics to remember numbers - The number/rhyme system
Mnemonics to remember your dreams
Advanced number mnemonics - Pegging
Mnemonics for quotations
Mnemonics to remember abstract symbols and letters
The Roman Room or journey system
Mnemonics to remember names and faces
Mnemonics for rememberring appointments - The Mental Diary
How to combine the systems - The Mental Database

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Pegging - The Major System

The system of pegging that I will be outlining over the course of the next few pages, is one of the most important techniques that has so far been developed in the field of Mnemonics, since the discipline was first practised during the time of the ancient Greeks. Second only to the system of linking in its overall usefulness.

A version of pegging was first put forward by a man named Stanislaus Mink von Wennsshein, around the year 1648. Since then the technique has been modified extensively by a number of researchers in the field. Notably by the Englishman Dr Richard Gray, in the year 1730. In more recent times the memory experts Harry Lorayne and Tony Buzan, amongst others, have modified the system further.

Basically what pegging does is to turn a number (any number), into a set of phonetic sounds or letters. These sounds are then joined together to form words, and these words may then be linked together to form a series of images. Finally these images may then be committed to memory. This enables an individual to recall numbers of up to (and above) 100 digits, with relative ease.

By combining the peg system with the system of linking (outlined in chapter four) you will find that you will be able to memorise huge lists of information, in an ordered and structured way.
So without further ado, here is how you do it!

The method

The first thing that you need to do in order to learn how to peg, is to memorise the basic phonetic sounds that will be used to represent the numbers 0-9. To speed up your mastery of this number/letter code, I have offered a few memory aids. With these aids, the code should not take you more than around about 20 minutes or so to commit to your long-term memory.

The number/letter code

In the number/letter code, the number 1 is represented by the letters t or d. This is made easy to remember if you observe that both of these letters have only one downstroke.

The number 2 is represented in this code, by the letter n. This has two downstroke's.

The number 3 is represented by the letter m. Again this is easily remembered if you make a note of the fact that the letter m possesses three solid downstroke’s.

Number 4 is represented by the last letter of that number, that is four = r.

The number 5 is represented by the Roman numeral for the number 50 – L.

Six is represented by its own mirror image – the letter j. It can also be represented by the sounds ch or sh.

The number 7 is represented by the letter k, which when broken apart is found to contain three number sevens. It may also be represented by the letters c or g.

The number 8 is represented by the letters f or v. You may notice that when written by hand, the number 8 and the letter “?” both contain two loops.

The number 9 is represented by the letters p or b. By turning either of these letters around, you will find that you are able to produce a number 9.

Finally the letters that are used to represent O are z or s. The first sound of the word zero.

So to summarise. The letters used to represent the numbers 0-9 are:

0
-
z,s
1
-
t,d
2
-
n
3
-
m
4
-
r
5
-
L
6
-
j, ch, sh
7
-
k, g, or c
8
-
ƒ, v
9
-
b, p

If you have taken a few minutes to go over the above code, then you should find that you are now able to translate any number into its respective letters (or sounds), and then into an image that may easily be recalled.

For example, if you want to transform the number 74 into a memorable image, then all that you need to do, is to remember that the number 7 and the number 4 are represented in the above code, by the letters c and r. These letters may be used as the first and the last sounds of a word, the middle of which may be filled in with a vowel, or any other letter that is not a part of the number/letter code. If you use the letter a, then you have the letters c, a and r ‘car.’

A simple image to visualise.

The number 22 consists of two N’s. In order for you to form a memorable word from these letters, you just need to insert a vowel between the two letters. If you use the letter U, then you have the letters n, u and n ‘nun.’ Again a relatively simple image to recollect!
The number 27 is made up of the letters n (2) and k (7). By the simple act of inserting the vowel – e, between these two letters, you are able to form the word ‘neck.’

So using the above three examples, if you wanted to remember the six digit number 742227, you would simply form a mental image that links together the words car, nun and neck. For example you might try imagining a car being driven by a nun, whose neck is so incredibly long that it protrudes from the sunroof.

As was explained previously on this site, comic images are far easier to commit to memory, than are dry facts or pieces of text.

Providing that you are totally familiar with the number/letter code, then you should have absolutely no difficulty at all in remembering the above image, and as a result the six-digit number that the image represents.

This system may be used to memorise dates, addresses, measurements, or even calculations. And the amazing thing about it, is that you are not only able to use the system to remember vast amounts of information, you can also organise that information however you like. This is due to the fact that all of the peg images are numbered.

I will now show you the 100 basic peg words, which with the aid of the number/letter code, should be relatively simple to memorise. Once you have committed these words to your long-term memory, you will have a list of 100 images, which you may link to whatever you like.

This should enable you to remember long lists of numbers or objects (in the correct order), with an ease that should pleasantly surprise you. There are also a variety of other uses that pegging may be put to. However I will elaborate on that point a little later on.

The 100 basic peg words

0 – Sow 5 – Law 10 – Doze 15 – Dual 20 – Noose 25 – Nail
1 – Dye 6 – Shoe 11 – Dad 16 – Dash 21 – Net 26 – Notch
2 – Knee 7 – Cow 12 – Dune 17 – Duck 22 – Nun 27 – Neck
3 – Ma 8 – Fee 13 – Dim 18 – Dove 23 – Gnome 28 – Knife
4 – Row 9 – Bay 14 – Deer 19 – Dab 24 – Nero 29 – Nip

30 – Mice 35 – Mail 40 – Rose 45 – Rail 50 – Lasie 55 – Lily
31 – Mud 36 – Mash 41 – Rat 46 – Rush 51 – Loot 56 – Leech
32 – Moon 37 – Make 42 – Rain 47 – Wreck 52 – Lane 57 – Leak
33 – Mum 38 – Movie 43 – Ram 48 – Roof 53 – Lame 58 – Lava
34 – Mower 39 – Map 44 – Rear 49 – Rope 54 – Lure 59 – Lip


60 – Chess 65 – Chill 70 – Case 75 – Cool 80 – Fuss 85 – Fall
61 – Chat 66 – Cha cha 71 – Cat 76 – Cash 81 – Foot 86 – Fish
62 – Chin 67 – Chalk 72 – Can 77 – Coke 82 – Fan 87 – Fog
63 – Chime 68 – Chief 73 – Comb 78 – Cave 83 – Foam 88 – Fife
64 - Chair 69 – Chip 74 – Car 79 – Cub 84 – Fur 89 – Fab


90 – Bus 95 – Ball
91 – Bat 96 – Bush
92 – Bun 97 – Book
93 – Beam 98 – Beef
94 – Beer 99 – Bib

CONTINUE

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